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Archive for February, 2015

Use Non-monetary Compensation To Cement the Relationship With Your Board Chair

February 26, 2015 1 Comment

Three different public transportation CEOs, three different but related true stories about strengthening the board chair-CEO working relationship:

  • The CEO got a call from the president of the local chamber of commerce, inviting the CEO to speak at the upcoming chamber luncheon meeting about the tie between public transportation and economic development. Knowing her chair’s strong interest in economic development and how much he enjoyed speaking, the CEO recommended her chair for the job. It turns out he was a great choice, acquitting himself extremely well at the podium and even joining the chamber’s economic development committee a few months
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Getting Your Board Involved in Image Building

February 10, 2015 0 Comments

Josh Barro’s article in the February 10 issue of the New York Times, “To Save on Rail Lines, Market the Bus Line,” makes a point that many if not most of us would agree with:  that, to quote from a 2009 FTA report, “Bus-based transit in the United States suffers from an image problem.”  Josh makes another point that many of us might not agree with:  “Transit agencies are spending millions of dollars on new rail infrastructure that is no faster than existing bus service, simply because riders perceive a train as better than a bus.”  While Josh’s second point … Read the rest

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CEOs Susan Meyer and Gary Thomas on Board-CEO Communication and Interaction

February 4, 2015 1 Comment

Keeping the board-CEO working relationship on an even keel and healthy over the long run is a major challenge. Just the fact that strong-willed people with robust egos have to be melded into enough of a team to do the extremely complex and demanding work of governing is challenging enough, but other factors tend to make the board-CEO partnership inherently fragile and prone to erode quickly if not diligently managed. For one thing, the high-pressure atmosphere at the top of your transportation authority, where high-stakes and often tremendously thorny issues are addressed – frequently with intense public scrutiny – tends … Read the rest

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