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Tag: board-CEO relationship

Boosting Your Board’s Self-Esteem

July 12, 2016 0 Comments

Sounds good to me!Hundreds of interviews with transportation board members over the years have taught me a valuable lesson.  Board members who take pride in their boards – and in their governing work – make more reliable partners for the CEO – the kind who’ll back you up when the you-know-what hits the proverbial fan, as it always eventually does.  And I’ve also learned that getting board members formally involved in managing their own governing performance is a sure-fire way to boost their self-esteem.

The December 2, 2015 post at this blog, “Strengthening Your Board’s Performance Management Is a Wise Investment,” tells how … Read the rest

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Beware of Those Insidious Foes That Can Do You In

April 8, 2016 0 Comments

jumping spider

I’m working on a new book about “insidious foes” of a close, positive, and productive board-CEO working relationship.  The foes are erroneous assumptions that can do serious damage to the  relationship.  A foe is “insidious” if it isn’t obviously dangerous.  In fact, many “insidious foes” are especially dangerous because they’re nuggets of conventional wisdom that appear to make good sense and don’t seem at all threatening at first blush.

An insidious foe that came immediately to mind when I was brainstorming my initial list was the erroneous assumption that organizational performance essentially determines the health of the board-CEO working relationship.  … Read the rest

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What Can You Do About the Inevitable Centrifugal Force On Your Board?

June 24, 2015 1 Comment

Diverse People in Meeting With Speech BubblesAs their half-day mini-retreat came to a close, the members of the board’s governance committee were feeling the kind of deep satisfaction that comes from doing an important, high-stakes governing job really well.  They’d updated the profile of board member attributes and qualifications (e.g., “successful experience serving on at least one other public or nonprofit board”) that they would use in finding candidates to fill the three seats coming vacant in a couple of months, and they’d identified two stakeholder organizations that should be represented on the board:  the local community hospital and largest manufacturing firm in the region. 

This … Read the rest

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