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Tag: transit organizational development

Blazing Trails on the Diversity and Inclusion Front at RTS

February 16, 2018 0 Comments

Bill Carpenter, RTS

In Changing By Design (Jossey-Bass, 1997), I recount a real-life example of the difference between what Chris Argyris calls “espoused theory” and “theory in practice.”  Early in my career I worked closely with a young, ambitious, fast-track college chief executive who was an avid consumer of the latest management thinking and could go on at length about one innovative technique or another.  A favorite hobbyhorse of his was participatory management and team building.  Waxing eloquent on the subject of teamwork as a key to organizational innovation, his eyes would tear up on occasion – he was that … Read the rest

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The Chief of Staff Alternative To a Chief Operating Officer

July 7, 2017 0 Comments

       Doug Eadie

The May 19 post at this blog explored the CEO-chief operating officer leadership structure, which has proved very effective in freeing up CEO time for direct interaction with the governing board and with key external stakeholders, while ensuring adequate attention to internal operations. However, dividing the chief executive office into a CEO and a COO is not a viable option for many  nonprofit and public organizations, either because the CEO directly supervises too few executives to justify a COO or the organization’s culture militates against the CEO-COO structure.  If your transit authority falls into one of these categories, … Read the rest

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Have You Considered Adding a Chief Operating Officer To Your Executive Team?

May 19, 2017 0 Comments

         Doug Eadie

A two-person executive office consisting of a chief executive officer who focuses on the relationship with the board, strategic planning, and external/stakeholder relations, and a chief operating officer (COO) who oversees all internal operations, is a staple in the for-profit sector. And these days I’m seeing the configuration more frequently in larger public and nonprofit corporations where several senior executives once reported directly to the CEO.  There’s a pretty compelling reason for adopting this executive management structure:  freeing up the CEO to focus upward and outward – interacting intensively with her board of directors, promoting her organization’s image … Read the rest

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